Weighted Carries for Fastpacking Training and Practice

For the majority of my outdoor trips and adventures, I’m mountain running: moving as quickly as I can in mountainous terrain all with the minimal amount of gear. I also go on multi-day trips and then my mountain running transforms into what’s called, fastpacking.

The goal is simply efficient all day movement over long distances, I’m not carrying all the heavy gear to comfortably hang out in a tent in a camp for long periods of time – I’m bringing just enough to get some rest when I’m not moving. I will be carrying additional gear in the form of an ultralight overnight sleep system, additional food, and perhaps some additional clothes and personal items.

I’ll be going over both training techniques that can help us move as fast as we can during our fastpacks, as well as some ways we can practice to optimize our time on our trip. I’ll be introducing a workout called Weighted Carries, which we’ll modify so that we can use it for both.

And as a bonus, I’ll go over some more tips and techniques to get you moving as fast as possible on your next fastpacking adventure.

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Vanishing Point Project Pages Up!

Pauite's North Ridge, one of the crux's of the route

The Milner to Berthoud Pass Continental Divide Ridge Traverse Fastpack was one of my biggest and proudest projects of 2020. Like the L.A. Freeway route, I think we’re going to see a lot of interest from people wanting to take it on in 2021 and beyond.

I’ve put together some evergreen content on the route itself, the vlogs I shot/edited while reconnoitering a route, photos from the route, a link to my own trip narrative, the Caltopo map, an interactive map, and a little bit of beta of the route. If I have more time in the future, I’ll further indulge in adding some more beta. Enjoy!

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Faster Fastpack Packing

Fastpacking differs from ultralight backpacking to me (although the line is indeed blurry) in one major way: the brisk movement through terrain is most likely the only objective. There’s rarely a large camping/cooking/hanging out portion of a fastpack. Instead it’s all about that forward motion: fastpacking is a multi-day, unsupported run.

It’s best to be as prepared beforehand for the adventure, and get your gear dialed in as best as possible. Part of this dialing in is picking out what to bring, as well as how to pack it. I’ll be focusing on the latter idea in this post.

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Nutrition for a Nolans 14 (and beyond) Fastpack

Nutrition is a difficult subject for me to broach, as I don’t feel as if I’m an expert on the subject to give advice to others. But, I can share the strategies that I personally take when doing my projects, and invite you to use it as a model for your own experiments. What I cover in this article is for unsupported, take no prisoners, as fast you can fastpacks on difficult mountainous terrain. Pack space is at a premium and the total weight is something you try to keep at a minimum. This will not be advice for an ultralight backpacking trip, which is a different beast altogether. No stopping to prepare a meal, no stove.

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Vanishing Point

"Stuck in the Middle" Peak

Pinned. In front of me, like plated back spikes of a malevolent dragon, was a sheer tower of rock twelve feet high, overhanging on all sides, 300-foot drops to the west and east, and no obvious way to climb up, over, then down to the next spire. How many more of these I would have to surmount was uncertain, but I’d already climbed over three of them. I told myself – perhaps in an attempt to keep calm, that it’s good I’m continuing to go forward, because there’s just no way I was going to be able to reverse the moves previous to get back down to the safer ground I left behind.

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Future Projects: Tenmile/Mosquito Range Traverse + Sangre de Cristo Range Traverse

The Fletcher to Atlantic Traverse

Sometimes it’s seems that it’s hard to follow up something like the Tour of the Highest Hundred with the next project. It took years to get myself physically and mentally ready to take something like that on – save nothing for the financial burden of taking so much time off work and the burden of that food bill!

Still, in the heartbeat, I’d do it all again. But the world is a big place, and there’s so many fun and challenging things to do – even so close to where I live. I don’t necessarily like to repeat myself, but I do like to progress in what it is I do, and in doing so: explore different facets of the talents I’ve taken a life to develop.

Anyways, the future! What’s on my mind to do this summer (or next)? Here’s two projects I’d like to try (more coming, later…)

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