Tabeguache Peak to Mt. Antero

Segment Overview: Tabeguache Peak to Mt. Antero
Segment Overview: Tabeguache Peak to Mt. Antero
Segment Profile: Tabeguache Peak to Mt. Antero
Segment Profile: Tabeguache Peak to Mt. Antero

 

 

From Tabeguache Peak, you’re going to drop down all the way back below treeline into the Browns Creek Basin. The going is mostly off trail to Browns Creek, so be prepared for a lot of talus hopping. Footing is good, albeit steep.

Nolans Line

From Tabeguache Peak, reverse your track until you reach the saddle of Tabeguache and Jones Peak West. At this point you’ll be leaving the most popular route to Tabeguache Peak, and heading into more rough terrain.

Do a descending traverse on the northwest side of Jones Peak West, then descend to the east of a fairly deep and nasty looking gully. Don’t descend into the gully! You may be able to pick up an old, unmaintained trail once you reach tundra. Pick your line off the slope and onto more gentler ground carefully, as the loosest material is on the bottom it seems.

Once at the bottom of the face of Jones West Peak, make your way north towards Browns Creek. Several old avalanche paths will lead you down, and a few cairns may make life easier.

Cross Browns Creek at an opportunistic place and follow the 4WD road (CR278) northwest. Once you’re due south of a break in the ridgeline, ascend off-trail into the break on somewhat loose ground. Steepest terrain will be at the top, right before you cross another 4WD road. Cairns/social trail may be present to help guide your way.

Cross over the 4WD road and continue upslope to yet another 4WD road. Several roads criss-cross the area, so consult the map/GPX. Take a 4WD that points north east towards the summit of Mt. Antero, and follow the road to an obvious parking lot. Prepare yourself for a lot of Jeep traffic – this isn’t much of a wilderness experience in this part of the line.

Once at the Jeep parking lot, spy a social trail that will take you on the last bit of elevation to the summit of Mt. Antero.

Slow-lans Alts.

Instead of hiking off the initial 4WD track you come to, after crossing Browns Creek, stay on the 4WD track and head west. This road will switchback up the slope to the west of the Nolans line and bring you up to another 4WD track that will then take you up almost to the summit of Mt. Antero/Jeep parking lot. From there, take the social trail the last few hundred feet to the summit of Mt. Antero.

Water

Copious and reliable water can be found at Browns Creek.

Camping

Good dispersed camping can be found around Browns Creek – pick a nice spot near the creek, and under the trees. Don’t expect to be alone in this location though, as it is possible to take a 4WD vehicle close into this area.

Bailing/Resupply

Once you cross over Browns Creek, head east on the 4WD track you come upon, and take this track east. The 4WD track will end, and the Browns Creek Trail will begin. Take this trail east until it runs into the Colorado Trail. Once at the Colorado Trail, you can hike north to Chalk Creek/Mount Princeton Hot Springs, or South to your starting location at Angel of Shavano Trailhead.

Once you cross over Browns Creek, head east on the 4WD track you come upon, and take this track east. The 4WD track will end, and the Browns Creek Trail will begin. Take this trail east until it runs into the Colorado Trail. Once at the Colorado Trail, you can hike north to Chalk Creek/Mount Princeton Hot Springs, or South to your starting location at Angel of Shavano Trailhead.

Skipping

Once you cross over Browns Creek, head east on the 4WD track you come upon, and take this track east. The 4WD track will end, and the Browns Creek Trail will begin. Take this trail east until it runs into the Colorado Trail. Once at the Colorado Trail, you can hike north to Chalk Creek/Mount Princeton Hot Springs. Once the Colorado Trail crosses Chalk Creek Road, head west towards Alpine to take the Nolans Line to Mt. Princeton, or east to continue on the Colorado Trail.

Continuing on the Colorado Trail will allow you to skip Princeton, or take a Slow-lans alt. up Mt. Princeton’s standard Route (both described in Antero to Princeton).

Next: Mt. Antero to Mt. Princeton


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